The Poetess Tradition

Pearch's Miscellanies

A Collection of Poems in Four Volumes. By Several Hands. 3rd Edition     



A Collection of Poems in Four Volumes. By Several Hands. A Collection of Poems; Consisting of Valuable Pieces, not inserted in Mr. Dodsley's Collection, or Published Since. With Several Originals, By Eminent Writers. Vol. I
1775


To Sir William Mayne, Bart.


[1]

Sir,
As the representative of my native city, permit me to dedicate this improved edition of a collection of poems to you, hoping they will not prove less worthy your patronage, when I inform you they are not a hasty selection; great attention having been paid to the opinions of some of our first critics. The Index will inform you of the very respectable names, who have contributed

[2]

to this work, many of whose pieces contained in these volumes are omitted in the several editions of their works.

Agreeable to the various dispositions and interests of mankind; so have been their different motives for dedication.--We read of Evar, king of Arabia, dedicating his book on the Nature of Precious Stones to Nero, because there was an (E) in his name, as well as the emperor's; nor are our modern authors less singular in this respect than the ancients; witness an ingenious poet, who addressed some of his poems to a noble earl, the motive for which address, he says, was not because he was a judge of the sciences, or the patron of learned men, but as having the honour to be

[3]

born in the same county with his lordship. A Reverend Divine dedicates his Christian Discourses to a Royal- Arch-Druidess, styling himself Chyndonax of Mount Haemus, Druid. Another, in a virulent humour, bespatters a Bishop in his satyrical dedication of Sermons; while many, not content with the various objects of this world, have traversed the planets for a patron. With less romantic views, I have been principally anxious that this inscription should be to a meritorious, as well as a distinguished, character. My ideas naturally lead me to solicit the present honour of addressing you, whose senatorial abilities have been so deservedly applauded in a neighbouring isle, and whose domestic virtues, tho' more confined, are not less

[4]

conspicuous in the extensive circle of your friends.
I have the honour to be, with the utmost respect and esteem, Sir,
your very obliged,
and most devoted
humble servant,

GEO. PEARCH





Date: 1775 (Web page revisions: 11/23/2005). Author: (Web page revisions: Laura Mandell).
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